Life with Alex — Official Movie Trailer

Life with Alex — Official Movie Trailer

DVD is available at our website www.LifeWithAlexMovie.com.
Life with Alex is a compelling film about non-human cognition and learning. Follow Alex, the African Grey parrot, and his colleagues — Dr. Irene Pepperberg, lab manager Arlene Levin-Rowe, and their student assistants — as they open a window for us into an unprecedented world. See never-before-released footage of Alex using meaningful human speech to convey his daily thoughts and feelings. Learn about Alex”s daily life, relationships, and accomplishments, which changed forever what we know about how animals think.

The “Life with Alex” DVD can be purchased at www.LifeWithAlexMovie.com
Visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/LifewithAlex

Winner of the New Jersey Film Festival – 2013
Official Selection, San Francisco Doc Fest – 2013
Official Selection, Arizona International Film Festival – 2013

55 Minutes
Directed by Emily Wick
Produced by Grey Parrot Studios
in association with The Alex Foundation
Press Contact: info@lifewithalexmovie.com

How to Pet a Parrot | Parrot Training

How to Pet a Parrot | Parrot Training

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Watch more How to Train Your Parrot videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512649-How-to-Pet-a-Parrot-Parrot-Training

This video is about how to pet your parrot. And many people don’t realize that birds can actually be really cuddly animals and they can enjoy head scratches. But, unlike a dog, they like it in a slightly different way.

So, come on over here, birdy. They like to be pet against their feathers like this. And what I like to call this is petting etiquette. Instead of just petting your bird whenever it wants and letting it use its beak to dictate where and when you pet it, I teach them petting etiquette, where I keep their beak between my fingers while I pet their head. This wa,y if I hit a spot that they don’t like, they can’t bite me and they can’t be bossy about which spots I do and don’t.

They have to take all or nothing. So, if they enjoy the petting, then they’re going to just keep their beak between my fingers and let me scratch them all over their heads. They also really enjoy getting scratched behind the ears. Birds do have ears, they’re just covered by feathers. They’re right over here, and they love getting theirs ears scratched.

Keep in mind that some birds aren’t accustomed to petting. They might not even like being touched on the head. So, you can use some of the training techniques that are outlined in my book and throughout these video series to get your bird to be accustomed to being touched. And once a bird is accustomed to being touched, you can pet its head.

And then, if it learns to like it, if the bird gets the chance to realize how good it feels, then this can become its own positive reinforcement and you can use the petting as a reward for good behavior. So, here’s some tips on petting your bird. Just remember that they like having their feathers stroked in the opposite direction. It’s a good idea to hold their beak so they can’t get too bossy and it’s also a sign that they like to be pet.

My birds, when they want petting they’ll come over and put their beak between my fingers, rather than bite me, because that’s the way I’ve always taught them to ask for it. Petting your bird is just a great way to build a relationship with your bird and teach them to like being on hands and being around people.

How to Train Parrot to Stop Screaming | Parrot Training

How to Train Parrot to Stop Screaming | Parrot Training

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Watch more How to Train Your Parrot videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512652-How-to-Train-Parrot-to-Stop-Screaming-Parrot-Training

Parrots are naturally really noisy creatures and they can be prone to screaming tendencies. This high-level, audible shrieking is highly undesirable, so it’s important to minimize it to the greatest extent. The first thing you have to realize is that all parrots are going to make noise. They are noisy creatures. You have to accept a certain amount of noise coming from a bird or you can’t get one, because that’s just how they are.

But, here’s the important thing, we want to discourage them from screaming any more than they naturally would. We can’t make them not scream at all completely, because that’s just part of being a bird. But, what we can do is we can try to avoid encouraging them to scream more for our attention and for other reasons. So, the strategy to reducing human-induced screaming is to avoid reinforcing screaming altogether.

So, if your parrot is screaming for your attention, the absolute worst thing you could possibly do is to come over and give the parrot attention or try to do something to get it to stop screaming. Anything and everything you do to try to make your parrot not scream, whether it’s to come over, to yell at it, to give it food, to give it toys, at that point you are rewarding the screaming and only encouraging it to scream more and more whenever it wants those things.

So, the most important thing you can do when your parrot screams is to ignore it. Do not walk over. Do not talk to it. Do not shout back. Do not give it food. Simply by avoiding any reaction to the screaming in the first place, you are most likely to not encourage anymore screaming than that very bare minimum. With time, parrots learn to scream less just because it doesn’t do anything.

They might still have their morning and evening screaming or vocalization sessions where they’ll make some noise. But, if you do not go over and encourage it further, they will not do it all the time. Also, it’s really good to do trick training and flying sessions with your parrot, because when they spend their energy they become quieter and more mellow throughout the day. So, there are some tips for you about reducing screaming in your parrot.

How to Take Your Parrot Outside | Parrot Training

How to Take Your Parrot Outside | Parrot Training

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Watch more How to Train Your Parrot videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512675-How-to-Take-Your-Parrot-Outside-Parrot-Training

Taking your parrot outside has many benefits. Not only is natural sunlight essential for your parrot, they need 15 minutes of sunlight every week, but it’s also a great experience. Many parrots that are housebound for many years some day when they need to be taken to a vet, to a groomer, they need to be taken to someone else’s home or left with someone to watch them, they freak out because they’ve never been outside the house.

The outdoor environment teaches your parrots to be comfortable and aware of things that are going on. It greatly desensitizes them. It exposes them to many different people and situations and makes them all around better pets. However, this doesn’t mean you can just grab your parrot, throw on a harness and take him outside right away. You need to desensitize them to the process a little at a time.

A good way to start is to take your parrot outside in a carrier the first few times so that it’s enclosed and can feel safe. Once your parrot is comfortable with that, whether it’s clipped or flighted, it’s a good idea to put a harness on your parrot to make sure it can’t fly away in case he gets scared. And you just take your parrot outside wearing his harness.

And the first few times you do it, you might want to even cup your parrot around, keep him from being able to fly away. You might want to hold his leash real close. By doing things like this, you ensure that your parrot’s first few experiences going outside aren’t going to turn out bad.

If something outdoors scares your parrot, and most likely in the first few times you take it outside, it will, you don’t want your parrot having a bad reaction of flying off and crashing into a pole, crashing on the ground, getting hurt. So, by holding the leash or even cupping your parrot for safety the first few times reduces the likelihood of an unintentional fly off and reduces the possibility your parrot will be scared of outdoors in general.

So, by ensuring that the first few time you take your parrot outside are harmless, over time you can do trick training and some target training outside. You can take your parrot to more places and have more experiences. Introduce it to people and let it enjoy the sunshine of being outdoors. Taking your parrot outside is a very stimulating and exciting experience and it’s both mutually beneficial to the parrot and human alike.

Kakapo – New Zealand

Kakapo – New Zealand

April 2003
The rare giant Kakapo parrot could soon be extinct. However one man is determined to save this beautiful species. And with the help of his dog, he may yet succeed.

Allan Munn runs a parrot sanctuary on Chalky Island. He relies on his dog, Heidi, to locate the endangered birds and is now on a quest to find a mate for one bird.

Produced by ABC Australia
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

Kaka String-Pulling Test Montage

Kaka String-Pulling Test Montage

I often get asked how I ended up working with parrot behaviour as a full-time job. Here is a blast from the past, some video I found from a presentation I gave in 2011 about my Post Graduate research… working with New Zealand kaka was amazing! Still hands down my favourite parrot species. There isn’t sound for most of the video but it is great to watch the innate behaviour of the birds, it isn’t trained this is natural problem solving ability. The study was comparing patterned problem solving abilities of kaka and the notoriously ‘intelligent’ New Zealand kea. If you are interested the kaka actually had better results than the kea, mostly as they had a longer attention span where the kea were brilliant but bored quickly. I love how you can see them thinking and actively problem solving in these tests.

Excuse the ‘potty-mouthed’ African Grey at the end, had to put that in! (he was from a separate study with other species)

Kea Parrot In Bremerhaven Zoo – Germany

Kea Parrot In Bremerhaven Zoo – Germany

Just Things Of Life
A Little Bit Of Everything.

Kea Parrot In Bremerhaven Zoo – Germany

Kea Parrot (Nestor notabilis) is also known as the New Zealand Mountain Parrot. The Kea Parrot is native to the mountains of New Zealand’s South Island. The Kea Parrot is normally found in forests or scrub lands between altitudes of 900 feet (300 metres) and 6,000 feet (2,000 metres). Kea Parrots are an important part of New Zealand’s tourism industry as many people come to national parks specifically to see Keas, who are very entertaining and playful birds.The kea is the world’s only alpine parrot.

Kea Parrot Description
Kea Parrots at maturity measure around 48 centimetres (19 inches) in length. Male Keas weigh more than female Keas. Females can be distinguished from males by their beaks, which are often less sharply curved and shorter.
A Kea Parrots plumage is olive green in colour, their nape and crown is yellow/green and their abdomen and chest is green with a brown tinge. Their lower back is orange to red in colour.
The under wing coverts are also orange to red, though the webbing of the primary flight feathers is blue. The flight feathers of a Kea have yellow banding on their undersides.
The tail of the Kea Parrot is bluish green in colour and has a black tip. Keas have dark grey feet, however, juveniles feet are more yellow. Kea Parrots have dark brown patches around their eyes and their irises are dark brown.

Kea Parrot Habitat
The Kea parrot is principally a mountain bird being found from around 600 – 2000 metres above sea level. During winter the Keas tend to spend most of their time at the lower altitudes where food is more plentiful, however, in spring and autumn they move up into the sub-alpine scrub and grassland to feed on seasonal fruit and berries.
Kea parrots prefer to spend most of their time on the ground entertaining humans with their side-hopping movements. However, when they are in flight they appear magnificent fliers. Kea Parrots like to get into buildings whatever way they can, even down chimneys. They make themselves welcome at ski lodges. Once inside buildings, nothing is sacred, if something can be chewed then they will have a go.

Kea Parrot Diet
The Kea parrots diet is quite varied including leaf buds, roots, berries, fruit, seeds, blossoms, nectar, carrion and insects. They are particularly fond of the nectar of flax, rata, snow totara and coprosma. The Keas long beak is a valuable tool in its search for food especially in crevices in between rocks and boulders and for prizing off the lids of rubbish bins. kea parrot will also scavenge dead animals like deer in pursuit of high-fat foods and has been witnessed attacking the occasional live sheep

Kea Parrot Behaviour
The Kea Parrot is a very playful, inquisitive and brave bird. As aforementioned, they have a tendency to enter buildings and they will even attack motor cars for their wiper blades and windscreen rubbers. They enjoy rolling around in snow and bathing in puddles of thawed ice and when in the air will perform aerobatics in the strong winds. When not trying to attract attention around humans, kea parrots are usually found in groups of around 10 individuals. During the breeding season when adults are mating, juveniles will form large flocks of up to 100 birds. Keas are semi-nocturnal and can be very active at night, especially during summer months. Keas are fairly hardy birds and once acclimatized they can tolerate a range of temperatures. There does tend to be a seasonal migration to warmer altitudes in the wild, though some birds will permanently live above the snow line in Alpine regions.
Kea parrots are noisy, lively birds who move around by hopping sideways in order to move forward.

Kea Parrot Reproduction
Female Kea Parrots reach sexual maturity when they are around 3 years old and males around 4 – 5 years old. Male Keas may mate with up to four females during breeding season. Female keas usually lay a clutch of 3 – 4 eggs between July and January in nests built in rocky areas. Nests are lined with moss and lichen. The eggs are incubated for 29 days. The hen will leave the nest to be fed or feed twice a day for around 1 hour at daybreak and again at nightfall with the birds venturing no further than 1 kilometre from the nest. When the young are around 1 month old, the male assists with their feeding. The young stay in the nest for between 10 – 13 weeks after which time they fledge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kea
http://www.birdchannel.com/bird-magazines/bird-talk/2009-january/kea-parrots.aspx

Kea Parrot Solves a Coin Puzzle | Nestor notabilis | Cincinnati Zoo

Kea Parrot Solves a Coin Puzzle | Nestor notabilis | Cincinnati Zoo

The kea (Nestor notabilis) is a large species of parrot of the superfamily Strigopoidea found in forested and alpine regions of the South Island of New Zealand. About 48 cm (19 in) long, it is mostly olive-green with a brilliant orange under its wings and has a large, narrow, curved, grey-brown upper beak. The kea is the world’s only alpine parrot. Its omnivorous diet includes carrion,[2] but consists mainly of roots, leaves, berries, nectar, and insects. Now uncommon, the kea was once killed for bounty due to concerns by the sheep-farming community that it attacked livestock, especially sheep.[3] It received full protection in 1986.[4]

The kea nests in burrows or crevices among the roots of trees. Kea are known for their intelligence and curiosity, both vital to their survival in a harsh mountain environment. Kea can solve logical puzzles, such as pushing and pulling things in a certain order to get to food, and will work together to achieve a certain objective.[5] They have been filmed preparing and using tools.

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kea