Wild Australia: Land of Parrots

Wild Australia: Land of Parrots

Australia (/ɒˈstreɪliə/, /ə-/, colloquially /-jə/), officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is an Oceanian country comprising the mainland of the Australian .

Great video about Australian birds Australia has about 800 species of bird, ranging from the tiny 8 cm Weebill to the huge, flightless Emu. It has been sugge.

Parrots (budgies, parakeets) are among the most conspicuous birds in Australia. They are everywhere and often in large numbers. These extraordinary birds .

The ability of the budgerigar to see ultraviolet light plays a crucial role in the budgie mating game. They’re just one of Australia’s flamboyant parrot species .

Real Facts About The Kakapo

Real Facts About The Kakapo

Learn the Real Facts about the rare, almost Extinct Kakapo

From Wikepedia:

The Kakapo (Māori: kākāpō, meaning night parrot), Strigops habroptila (Gray, 1845),[2] also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand.[3] It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, a distinct facial disc of sensory, vibrissa-like feathers, a large grey beak, short legs, large feet, and wings and a tail of relatively short length. A certain combination of traits makes it unique among its kind—it is the world’s only flightless parrot, the heaviest parrot, nocturnal, herbivorous, visibly sexually dimorphic in body size, has a low basal metabolic rate, no male parental care, and is the only parrot to have a polygynous lek breeding system. It is also possibly one of the world’s longest-living birds.[4] Its anatomy typifies the tendency of bird evolution on oceanic islands, with few predators and abundant food: a generally robust physique, with accretion of thermodynamic efficiency at the expense of flight abilities, reduced wing muscles, and a diminished keel on the sternum.[4] Like many other New Zealand bird species, the Kakapo was historically important to the Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, appearing in many of their traditional legends and folklore. It was hunted and used as a resource by Māori, both for its meat as a food source and for its feathers, which were used to make highly valued pieces of clothing. It was also sometimes kept as a pet.

The Kakapo is critically endangered; as of February 2012, only 126[5] living individuals are known,[6] most of which have been given names.[7] Because of Polynesian and European colonisation and the introduction of predators such as cats, rats, ferrets, and stoats, the Kakapo was almost wiped out. Conservation efforts began in the 1890s, but they were not very successful until the implementation of the Kakapo Recovery Plan in the 1980s. As of April 2012, surviving Kakapo are kept on three predator-free islands, Codfish (Whenua Hou), Anchor and Little Barrier islands, where they are closely monitored.[8][9] Two large Fiordland islands, Resolution and Secretary, have been the subject of large-scale ecological restoration activities to prepare self-sustaining ecosystems with suitable habitat for the Kakapo. The New Zealand government is willingly providing the use of these islands to Kakapo conservation.

Green Cheek Conure Parrot Talking

Green Cheek Conure Parrot Talking

Nothing gets Guava talking like the sound of water. I was washing the dishes when she began chatting up a storm. I managed to catch the last few minutes of it on video. You may be able to hear her say, “Hi,” “Give me Kiss,” and “Hi Cutie.” I do apologize for the sound of the water in the background, but she would have stopped talking if I turned it off.

CAUTION: Please always supervise your pets to reduce chance of accidents. Parrots love to chew on just about anything, including electrical cords, so please watch them closely.

Also, not all parrots will learn to talk. Please do not purchase these birds just for entertainment. They are incredibly emotional and require a lot of time, care, and supervision.