Eclectus & Major Mitchell Parrot Free Flying

Eclectus & Major Mitchell Parrot Free Flying

Pabu has made friends with Marley the eclectus, our new group member to our free flight group “Get Flocked”.

Marley has now advanced to a skill level where he is able to come out to new locations, Pabu was more then happy to show him the ropes at Roku & Korra’s favourite spot!

Please visit www.adventuresofroku.com/Educational.php for free flight information.

I ADOPTED AN ECLECTUS PARROT

I ADOPTED AN ECLECTUS PARROT

Last week I adopted a female Eclectus Parrot and have been DYING to show her to you guys ever since ^_^

Thank You For Watching – It really means so much to me 🙂

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– Last Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0gS6KG–z4

– Meet My Other Pets: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYYn2MRjB1w

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Music: “Lifes Happy Journey” by Legend From Heaven

Eclectus Parrot

Eclectus Parrot

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The Eclectus Parrot, Eclectus roratus, is a parrot native to the Solomon Islands, Sumba, New Guinea and nearby islands, northeastern Australia and the Maluku Islands (Moluccas). It is unusual in the parrot family for its extreme sexual dimorphism of the colours of the plumage; the male having a mostly bright green plumage and the female a mostly bright red and purple/blue plumage. Joseph Forshaw, in his book Parrots of the World, noted that the first European ornithologists to see Eclectus Parrots thought they were of two distinct species. Large populations of this parrot remain, and they are sometimes considered pests for eating fruit off trees. Some populations restricted to relatively small islands are comparably rare. Their bright feathers are also used by native tribes people as decorations.

The Eclectus Parrot is unusual in the parrot family for its marked sexual dimorphism in the colours of the plumage. A stocky short-tailed parrot, it measures around 35 cm (14 in) in length. The male is mostly bright green with a yellow-tinge on the head. It has blue primaries, and red flanks and underwing coverts. Its tail is edged with a narrow band of creamy yellow, and is dark grey edged with creamy yellow underneath, and the tail feathers are green centrally and more blue as they get towards the edges. The Grand eclectus female is mostly bright red with a darker hue on the back and wings. The mantle and underwing coverts darken to a more purple in colour, and the wing is edged with a mauve-blue. The tail is edged with yellowish-orange above, and is more orange tipped with yellow underneath. The upper mandible of the adult male is orange at the base fading to a yellow towards the tip, and the lower mandible is black. The beak of the adult female is all black. Adults have yellow to gold irises and juveniles have dark brown to black irises. The upper mandible of both male and female juveniles are brown at the base fading to yellow towards the biting edges and the tip.

The above description is for the nominate race. The abdomen and nape of the females are blue in most subspecies, purple abdomen and nape in the subspecies from the north and central Maluku Islands (roratus and vosmaeri), and red abdomen and nape in the subspecies from Sumba and Tanimbar Islands (cornelia and riedeli). Females of two subspecies have a yellow-tipped tail; taken to the extreme in riedeli and vosmaeri which also have yellow undertail coverts. The female vosmaeri displays the brightest red of all the subspecies, both on the head and body.