Last Chance To See – The Kiwi – BBC Two

Last Chance To See – The Kiwi – BBC Two

http://www.bbc.co.uk/lastchancetosee/
Stephen Fry and zoologist Mark Carwardine head to the ends of the earth in search of animals on the edge of extinction.

In New Zealand the travellers make their way through one of the most dramatic landscapes in the world. They are on a journey to find the last remaining kakapo, a fat, flightless parrot which, when threatened with attack, adopts a strategy of standing very still indeed.

Kakapo

Kakapo

Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

Kakapo · Hirini Melbourne

Toiapiapi

℗ Shearwater AssociatesLtd

Released on: 2016-10-06

Author: Hirini Melbourne
Composer: Hirini Melbourne
Music Publisher: Shearwater Associates Ltd

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Kakapo |El loro más grande del mundo| (Animales del Mundo) |Especial países|

Kakapo |El loro más grande del mundo| (Animales del Mundo) |Especial países|

Kakapo (Strigops habroptilus)

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Fuentes:
http://animaldiversity.org/accounts/Strigops_habroptila/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kakapo
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strigops_habroptilus
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Zealand_parrot
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lek_mating
https://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sceloglaux_albifacies

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KAKAPO, night parrot

KAKAPO, night parrot

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The kakapo (Māori: kākāpō or night parrot), Strigops habroptilus (Gray, 1845), also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless,nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand.[2]
It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, a distinct facial disc of sensory, vibrissa-like feathers, a large grey beak, short legs, large feet, and wings and a tail of relatively short length. A combination of traits make it unique among its kind; it is the world’s only flightless parrot, the heaviest parrot, nocturnal, herbivorous, visibly sexually dimorphic in body size, has a low basal metabolic rate and no male parental care, and is the only parrot to have a polygynous lek breeding system. It is also possibly one of the world’s longest-living birds.[3] Its anatomy typifies the tendency of bird evolution on oceanic islands, with few predators and abundant food: a generally robust physique, with accretion of thermodynamic efficiency at the expense of flight abilities, reduced wing muscles, and a diminishedkeel on the sternum.[3] Like many other New Zealand bird species, the kakapo was historically important to the Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, appearing in many of their traditional legends and folklore. It was hunted and used as a resource by Māori, both for its meat as a food source and for its feathers, which were used to make highly valued pieces of clothing. It was also sometimes kept as a pet.
The kakapo is critically endangered; as of March 2014, with an additional six[4] from the first hatchings since 2011, the total known population is only 126[5] living individuals, as reported by the Kakapo Recovery programme, most of which have been given names.[6]Because of Polynesian and European colonisation and the introduction of predators such as cats, rats, ferrets, and stoats, the kakapo was almost wiped out. Conservation efforts began in the 1890s, but they were not very successful until the implementation of the Kakapo Recovery plan in the 1980s. As of April 2012, surviving kakapo are kept on three predator-free islands, Codfish (Whenua Hou), Anchorand Little Barrier islands, where they are closely monitored.[7][8] Two large Fiordland islands, Resolution and Secretary, have been the subject of large-scale ecological restoration activities to prepare self-sustaining ecosystems with suitable habitat for the kakapo. The New Zealand government is willingly providing the use of these islands to kakapo conservation.

Sirocco The Film (official trailer)

Sirocco The Film (official trailer)

There are so few Kakapo parrots left on the planet Earth that every individual bird has been named. And one is a house-hold name in New Zealand. Sirocco. A bird so popular, that he landed a government job. This is the bizarre story of his rise to stardom.

Film Duration: 15 min

Visit the page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Sirocco-The-Film/674841569200420?fref=ts

Kakapo Chicks Day Out – Arrowtown, New Zealand

Kakapo Chicks Day Out – Arrowtown, New Zealand

Real Journeys helped bring three precious Kakapo Chicks to Arrowtown in May 2014 for a one off public viewing.
This resulted in some very happy people and funds raised in support of the Kakapo Recovery Programme.

Real Journeys has a strong history of conservation so this initiative was a natural fit!

Behind the Scenes Parrot Tour of Peabody Parrot Collection

Behind the Scenes Parrot Tour of Peabody Parrot Collection

http://ParrotWizard.com/Store

This is a behind the scenes tour of the parrot collection in the storage room of the Peabody Museum in Yale. Daniel Field, a doctoral candidate, shows and talks about parrots from all over the world. You will see Black Red Tailed Cockatoos up close, Cape Parrots, Kea Parrot, and the extinct Carolina Parakeet. Also you will get to see the skeleton of a Senegal Parrot, Hyacinth Macaw, and Kakapo.

Recent Kakapo Hatchings in New Zealand Boost Population

Recent Kakapo Hatchings in New Zealand Boost Population

Kakapos are making a sweet little comeback in New Zealand.

Kakapos are making a sweet little comeback in New Zealand. A few new chicks have finally arrived in the country, due to a slight but very significant baby boom.

The chicks are the first to be born in three years. The six chicks have made New Zealand’s kakapo population reach the 130 mark. The species is often called the owl parrot, given their striking resemblance to owls.

Native to New Zealand, the ground dwelling birds, which can weigh up to 8 pounds, are entirely flightless and are thought to be the world’s rarest and most bizarre parrot.

Kakapos are considered to be critically endangered. Contributing to their scarceness is the fact they only breed about three times over the course of a decade.

Prior to the recent hatchings, the last time any chicks were born was in 2011. On February 28th of this year, the first surviving chick named Lisa One hatched.

She’s definitely a fighter as her mother crushed the egg prior to the hatching. Luckily, rangers intricately pieced it back together. Five of the hatchings took place on the predator free Codfish Island, while the remaining one hatched on Little Barrier Island.

Three of them were taken in by the New Zealand Department of Conservation’s Kakapo Recovery program where they will be hand fed. Another two were fostered to kakapo mothers and will be continuously monitored.

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Owl Parrot | The Kakapo, New Zealand

Owl Parrot | The Kakapo, New Zealand

Owl Parrot | The Kakapo, New Zealand
The kakapo and also called owl parrot, Maori: kakapo, night parrot, Strigops habroptilus, is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand. At length kakapo reaches 60 cm, has a very soft feathers (see the 8th photo), greenish-yellow in the abdomen and moss-green with black stripes on the back, as well as being the heaviest in the world, weighing up to 3.5 kilograms or 8 lbs. The name owl parrot got for what plumage front part of the head is similar to the owl as feathers in this place a disk image. Kakapo voice like a hoarse croak, sometimes turning into squeals. These parrots can not fly, and can only plan, covering the air distance is only 20-30 meters. In nature, kakapo live mostly on the ground, hiding in burrows during the day and in the evening and at night going to feed. Owl parrots – vegetarians eat berries and juice plants.
The Kākāpō, night parrot was originally described by English ornithologist George Robert Gray in 1845. Its generic name is derived from the Ancient Greek strix, genitive strigos “owl”, and ops “face”, while its specific epithet comes from habros “soft”, and ptilon “feather”. It has so many unusual features that it was initially placed in its own tribe, Strigopini. Recent phylogenetic studies have confirmed the unique position of this genus as well as the closeness to the Kaka and the Kea, both belonging to the New Zealand parrot genus Nestor. Together, they are now considered a separate family within the parrots, Strigopidae. Within the Strigopidae, the kakapo is placed in its own tribe, Strigopini. The common ancestor of the kakapo and the genus Nestor became isolated from the remaining parrot species when New Zealand broke off from Gondwana, around 82 million years ago. Around 70 million years ago, the kakapo diverged from the genus Nestor.
The birds live in New Zealand, an island country which had virtually no mammals living on it for millions of years. It was a place inhabited by birds and reptiles. The only types of mammal were two species of bats. The Kakapo did not learn the defense mechanisms to combat or escape mammalian predators. This made the parrot very vulnerable when new animals started showing up. The arrival of Polynesian peoples thousands of years ago, of Europeans in the 1800’s, and ultimately the pets and livestock they brought with them resulted in the massive decline of Kakapo populations from hundreds of thousands to a mere handful of birds.
Kakapo build nests in crevices of rocks or rotten stumps of old trees. In January-February, the females lay two eggs. They are an endangered species, currently listed in the Red Book. During the development of the islands of New Zealand were brought new predators – cats and rats, which were major enemies of owls parrots. New Zealand Aluminium Smelter (NZAS) has sponsored the kakapo recovery programme since 1990. Scientific research and operational support have provided a stronger foundation for the recovery of kakapo, one of the the world’s rarest parrots. Once common throughout the three main islands of New Zealand, there are now approximately 62 Kakapo left. These remaining birds have been relocated to six predator free island habitats, where the birds are relatively safe and have been breeding!
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