De kneuzige kakapo – Kakapo – Last Chance to See, Stephen Fry

De kneuzige kakapo – Kakapo – Last Chance to See, Stephen Fry

Als één dier met recht een pechvogel genoemd kan worden is het wel de kakapo. Hoe kan het dat evolutie ooit zo’n onhandige, aan de grond gekluisterde tweevoeter heeft opgeleverd? Waarom is die stinkende scharrelpapegaai niet al duizenden jaren geleden uitgestorven? En belangrijker: heeft de kakapo nog een kans om te overleven, of laat de evolutie hem nu echt in de steek? Lees meer in het boek ‘De stinkende scharrel papegaai’

Training Kakapo Chicks

Training Kakapo Chicks

Three of this year’s chicks hand to be hand raised. Our goal is to train them all to be comfortable with behaviors that would make their medical care easier. One bird will also be a back up ambassador bird for Sirocco. In a few weeks all three will be released into the wild. The goal is for the birds to live as wild birds, but cooperate in health care as needed.These are clips from their first session. Learn more about Kakapo at The Kakapo Recovery Program here http://www.kakaporecovery.org.nz/
Barbara Heidenreich
www.BarbarasFFAT.com
Copyright 2014

Kakapo: The Bird That Doesn’t Know How To Fly | Wild Things

Kakapo: The Bird That Doesn’t Know How To Fly | Wild Things

Find out the truth behind all of the Kakapos’ strange behaviours, from their unusual mating rituals to their inability to fly.
Watch the full documentary: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=bxyVG9rSrjE

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Meet the Kakapo

Meet the Kakapo

Weighing in as the world’s heaviest parrot, the kākāpō is also one of the most endangered. Find out how DOC is working to save the only flightless parrot in the world. Meet the Locals is a partnership between DOC and TVNZ 6 and is distributed by Bush Telly with permission.

Real Facts About The Kakapo

Real Facts About The Kakapo

Learn the Real Facts about the rare, almost Extinct Kakapo

From Wikepedia:

The Kakapo (Māori: kākāpō, meaning night parrot), Strigops habroptila (Gray, 1845),[2] also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless, nocturnal, ground dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand.[3] It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, a distinct facial disc of sensory, vibrissa-like feathers, a large grey beak, short legs, large feet, and wings and a tail of relatively short length. A certain combination of traits makes it unique among its kind—it is the world’s only flightless parrot, the heaviest parrot, nocturnal, herbivorous, visibly sexually dimorphic in body size, has a low basal metabolic rate, no male parental care, and is the only parrot to have a polygynous lek breeding system. It is also possibly one of the world’s longest-living birds.[4] Its anatomy typifies the tendency of bird evolution on oceanic islands, with few predators and abundant food: a generally robust physique, with accretion of thermodynamic efficiency at the expense of flight abilities, reduced wing muscles, and a diminished keel on the sternum.[4] Like many other New Zealand bird species, the Kakapo was historically important to the Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, appearing in many of their traditional legends and folklore. It was hunted and used as a resource by Māori, both for its meat as a food source and for its feathers, which were used to make highly valued pieces of clothing. It was also sometimes kept as a pet.

The Kakapo is critically endangered; as of February 2012, only 126[5] living individuals are known,[6] most of which have been given names.[7] Because of Polynesian and European colonisation and the introduction of predators such as cats, rats, ferrets, and stoats, the Kakapo was almost wiped out. Conservation efforts began in the 1890s, but they were not very successful until the implementation of the Kakapo Recovery Plan in the 1980s. As of April 2012, surviving Kakapo are kept on three predator-free islands, Codfish (Whenua Hou), Anchor and Little Barrier islands, where they are closely monitored.[8][9] Two large Fiordland islands, Resolution and Secretary, have been the subject of large-scale ecological restoration activities to prepare self-sustaining ecosystems with suitable habitat for the Kakapo. The New Zealand government is willingly providing the use of these islands to Kakapo conservation.

The Flightless Parrot Kakapo

The Flightless Parrot Kakapo

This short video is about my travel to Codfish Island, and why I went there. My fascination for this bird started a few years back when I watched an episode of the series “Living Planet” by David Attenborough. I booked a flight to New Zealand and managed to do volunteer work on Codfish Island, home of the Kakapo.

This is my first video, and I’ve certainly never done any voice over. It was a lot of fun to make this video, and I hope you enjoy watching it!

KAKAPO, night parrot

KAKAPO, night parrot

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The kakapo (Māori: kākāpō or night parrot), Strigops habroptilus (Gray, 1845), also called owl parrot, is a species of large, flightless,nocturnal, ground-dwelling parrot of the super-family Strigopoidea endemic to New Zealand.[2]
It has finely blotched yellow-green plumage, a distinct facial disc of sensory, vibrissa-like feathers, a large grey beak, short legs, large feet, and wings and a tail of relatively short length. A combination of traits make it unique among its kind; it is the world’s only flightless parrot, the heaviest parrot, nocturnal, herbivorous, visibly sexually dimorphic in body size, has a low basal metabolic rate and no male parental care, and is the only parrot to have a polygynous lek breeding system. It is also possibly one of the world’s longest-living birds.[3] Its anatomy typifies the tendency of bird evolution on oceanic islands, with few predators and abundant food: a generally robust physique, with accretion of thermodynamic efficiency at the expense of flight abilities, reduced wing muscles, and a diminishedkeel on the sternum.[3] Like many other New Zealand bird species, the kakapo was historically important to the Māori, the indigenous people of New Zealand, appearing in many of their traditional legends and folklore. It was hunted and used as a resource by Māori, both for its meat as a food source and for its feathers, which were used to make highly valued pieces of clothing. It was also sometimes kept as a pet.
The kakapo is critically endangered; as of March 2014, with an additional six[4] from the first hatchings since 2011, the total known population is only 126[5] living individuals, as reported by the Kakapo Recovery programme, most of which have been given names.[6]Because of Polynesian and European colonisation and the introduction of predators such as cats, rats, ferrets, and stoats, the kakapo was almost wiped out. Conservation efforts began in the 1890s, but they were not very successful until the implementation of the Kakapo Recovery plan in the 1980s. As of April 2012, surviving kakapo are kept on three predator-free islands, Codfish (Whenua Hou), Anchorand Little Barrier islands, where they are closely monitored.[7][8] Two large Fiordland islands, Resolution and Secretary, have been the subject of large-scale ecological restoration activities to prepare self-sustaining ecosystems with suitable habitat for the kakapo. The New Zealand government is willingly providing the use of these islands to kakapo conservation.

Recent Kakapo Hatchings in New Zealand Boost Population

Recent Kakapo Hatchings in New Zealand Boost Population

Kakapos are making a sweet little comeback in New Zealand.

Kakapos are making a sweet little comeback in New Zealand. A few new chicks have finally arrived in the country, due to a slight but very significant baby boom.

The chicks are the first to be born in three years. The six chicks have made New Zealand’s kakapo population reach the 130 mark. The species is often called the owl parrot, given their striking resemblance to owls.

Native to New Zealand, the ground dwelling birds, which can weigh up to 8 pounds, are entirely flightless and are thought to be the world’s rarest and most bizarre parrot.

Kakapos are considered to be critically endangered. Contributing to their scarceness is the fact they only breed about three times over the course of a decade.

Prior to the recent hatchings, the last time any chicks were born was in 2011. On February 28th of this year, the first surviving chick named Lisa One hatched.

She’s definitely a fighter as her mother crushed the egg prior to the hatching. Luckily, rangers intricately pieced it back together. Five of the hatchings took place on the predator free Codfish Island, while the remaining one hatched on Little Barrier Island.

Three of them were taken in by the New Zealand Department of Conservation’s Kakapo Recovery program where they will be hand fed. Another two were fostered to kakapo mothers and will be continuously monitored.

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