Training a Scared Ringneck -| Part 2

Watch Part 1 here if you haven’t
1. Try Sharing Meals With Your Bird
Sharing your food with your bird is a great way to help him see you as part of his flock. In the wild, bonded birds regurgitate food for one another, so sharing a meal can go a long way in helping your bird realize that you mean no harm. If you choose to offer your bird a tasty treat from your plate, make sure that the food you are sharing is free of salt and seasonings and is safe for birds to eat. If your bird is hesitant about trying a food at first, put a bite into his bowl and eat your portion in front of him. Speak softly and talk about how good the food is. Believe it or not, it often works!

2. Make Time to Socialize
Some birds, particularly those that have been rehomed or rescued, may not have had much exposure to humans during their lifetime. Worse still, some may have had very negative experiences concerning people. The best way to deal with problems like these is to desensitize the bird to your presence. If your bird gets nervous every time you come around, slowly start to take 5 to 10 minutes a day to sit near your bird and talk to him. Be careful not to make any sudden moves around the bird, and talk in a happy, animated voice. As your bird gets more comfortable around you, you can begin to spend longer periods of time with him.

3. Try Some Grooming Sessions
Grooming is the first thing in nature that forms a bond between families. Since the point of bonding with your bird is to get him to accept you as a family member, grooming can be a great way to get the message across if the bird will tolerate handling. If the bird will allow you to, try gently scratching the back of his head or helping him out with a few pinfeathers. Once your bird begins to trust you more, you may even decide to invest in a shower perch so that your feathered friend can join you in the tub!

4. Let the Music Move You
Wild birds have two main forms of communication: their voices, and body language. As bird owners, we can use this knowledge to help ourselves bond more closely with our captive pets. If it seems like your bird doesn’t view you as much of a friend, then try singing some of your favorite songs to your pet and dancing around. It sounds a bit silly, but most birds can’t resist joining in the fun. You may even want to play some of these popular songs about birds to help set the mood.

5. Try Some Good Old Fashioned Bribery
One way to entice shy birds out of the cage to play is to bribe them. Try making up a batch of homemade bird toys and place some in your pet’s cage for him to enjoy. Make notes of the ones that seem to be his favorites, and then try “decorating” your shirt with them while standing near an open cage door. This may help your bird see how much fun you can be, and is sometimes an offer that even very timid birds can’t refuse.

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Comments

  1. I know that this is a old video but I have the same problem but when I try to train him he fly what should I do is it ok to cut little bit of his wings?

  2. My parrot is very sensitive. When I tried to touch its head, it shook it fast and tried to bite me. This happens always and fast.

  3. your parrot is not afraid like mine even if i walk beside the cage it scream and fly here and there

  4. omg help me with my indian ringneck he is a boy but when ever i get my hand near him he freaks iut and runs away plz tell me what to dp

  5. I havea two year old African ringneck who runs when I grab her she is very nice doesn't bite and will get on my hand but she runs and goes crazy when I try to pet her…. What do I do

  6. I am having a indian parrot. It's female parrot 8 months old. But I bring her wen she is 7 month old.she is not taming with me .when I go near she starts flying. She ll hide under cot or dining table.she is not standing one place tat u shown in ur video .can u guide me

  7.  
    Parrot Whisperer. Please reply to this message I have an Indian ringneck he is tamed but doesn't;t allow me to touch him. He flys to me, sits on me. Only thing is he doesn't allow anyone to pet him. He opens his beak and starts to attack my hand when I try to approach him. Im trying to touch his beak, he fly's away. They only way I can touch his beak is when I feed him a piece of apple in the cage. That's when I can touch his beak. Am I doing this right????? please help me

  8.  
    Parrot Whisperer. Please reply to this message I have an Indian ringneck he is tamed but doesn't;t allow me to touch him. He flys to me, sits on me. Only thing is he doesn't allow anyone to pet him. He opens his beak and starts to attack my hand when I try to approach him. Im trying to touch his beak, he fly's away. They only way I can touch his beak is when I feed him a piece of apple in the cage. That's when I can touch his beak. Am I doing this right????? please help me

  9. So I watched your video here with the "wild" ringneck. I think you mean untamed which is common for ringnecks who don't get daily interaction. I am a bit worried because I'm quite sure the ringneck we were talking about, doesn't have a ring and is female so this isn't even the same parrot? One, never use gloves again (I saw the other video), always promote the stick method first to pick up, or at most give the arm, but the best way is to understand when not to touch your bird and when to give it space. Do not try and pet the neck of a bird that does not know you, they are not dogs or cats, this is intimate for them and should be left to people who they know and trust. Less than a month is too early to not expect your bird to bite you or be used to you or afraid of you. You need to actually clicker train him with a clicker and not just a stick. You were talking too much, I found it best to not be speaking so much when you're trying to clicker train. Although this is over a year old, you are still too used to hovering your hands over or near your parrots. You must also mention that sessions need to stay short and if the bird is not having it and is irritated, you back away and try to train at a later time. You mentioned that this bird was not in the mood and you were very correct. As soon as its head backed away from your hand, it was not inviting you to be near it so close and you should have stopped from progressing to touch it further. With the amount of mistakes you did in the video, I would suggest to remove it so followers do not get the wrong ideas and perhaps re-post it doing a voice over of what you've learned to do better in a year that was not so good in this video. You are aiming for professional and respectable level and if you keep up videos that do not maintain that quality then people will have doubts in your capabilities.